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2018-2019 BHS Course Offerings Catalog

ENGLISH

English 9-410000 -- Prerequisite:8th grade English Students will study important literary elements by reading a variety of short stories, nonfiction essays, novels, and dramas. In addition, they will review the parts of speech and their correct use, sentence structure, usage, and punctuation. Students will be expected to develop writing skills through argumentative, reflective narrative, and analytical expository essays. Vocabulary study is emphasized during the entire year. Students will engage in independent and group work, Socratic Seminars, research, writing, and classroom presentations. Students will be expected to complete independent reading assignments.

English 10 Oral Comm Embedded 511020 - Prerequisite: English 9 The study of world literature in the form of novels, plays, poems, and short stories is the foundation of this course. The study of language including grammar, spelling, and vocabulary will be incorporated into each unit. Students will write in response to texts, analyze literature, compose essays, participate in class discussions, conduct sustained research projects, and create performance-based projects for assessment. Since the ability to produce effective verbal and written communication are key 21st century skills, students will be provided structured opportunities to learn cooperatively and individually. Instruction will incorporate a variety of media delivered through direct instruction, lecture, questioning, and discussion. Curriculum includes the frameworks to embed the Oral Communications requirement of the Arkansas Department of Education to meet state requirements for graduation.

Pre AP English 10 Oral Comm Embedded - Prerequisite: English 9 and recommended a student earn an A or B or grade in English 9. Pre-AP English 10 Oral Comm Embedded is designed to prepare students to enter AP Literature and Composition as a junior and AP Language and Composition their senior year. Emphasis is placed on literary and rhetorical analysis, developing complex vocabulary, and the close reading of texts. Special Projects/Assignments: Students complete in-depth analysis of selected novels, plays, and nonfiction (essays, speeches, etc.) not included in the textbook. Summer reading is required. 

412000 - English 11 - Prerequisite: English 10. From survival to mass hysteria to rebellion, in this class you will learn to better understand human nature through the study of American Literature. You will have many opportunities for self-expression through personal and academic writing. Language and grammar skills will be strengthened in the context of literacy and writing with a focus on improving ACT reading and English scores. Special supplies/costs: sticky notes, highlighter, composition notebook. 

517040 - AP Literature & Composition - 11th Prerequisite Pre-AP English 11 recommended as well as recommended an A or B or grade in Pre-AP English 10 Oral Comm. This course can be taken the junior or senior year. This course will provide an analytical study of literature in a comprehensive program of reading, writing, and critical thinking that prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Exam of the College Board. Independent literary analysis and a total mastery of writing skills will be primary goals of this course. It will meet the needs of academically gifted or highly advanced, highly motivated students who hope to bypass introductory courses in composition and literature when they enter college. The course includes American and some world literature, and students will read a variety of novels, plays, short stories, and poems. Students should expect SUBSTANTIAL outside reading. 

413000 - English 12 Prerequisite: English 11 or AP Language. Senior English is primarily the study of British literature in the form of novels, plays, poems, and short stories. The study of language including grammar, spelling, and vocabulary will be incorporated into each unit. Students will be provided structured opportunities to learn cooperatively and individually by writing in response to texts, analyzing literature, composing essays, participating in class discussions, conducting sustained research projects, and creating performance-based projects in order to produce effective verbal and written communications which are key 21st century skills.

517030 - AP Language and Composition - Prerequisite: English II or AP Literature & Composition as well as an A/B or grade in English 11 . In AP Language you will learn how to recognize subtle techniques used by writers, speakers, movie producers, advertisers, etc. to manipulate your thoughts and actions based on their perception of you. Conversely, you will have the skills necessary to subtly “convince” any audience to understand your position through the use of logic and logical fallacies. AP Language is not about literary themes; rather, it is about effectively communicating your position on a variety of real world topics to real audiences. All College Board standards and guidelines are followed in this AP Course.

519930 – Concurrent English 11 or Composition I Prerequisite: ACT of 19 or above in English and Reading. This semester course is offered as a concurrent credit through UA Fort Smith. Student will receive 3 college credit hours for the course. This course provides basic instruction in writing and analysis of prose.

519940 – Concurrent English 12 or Composition II Prerequisite: Comp I This semester course is offered as a concurrent credit through UA Fort Smith. Student will receive 3 college credit hours for the course. This course provides instruction in rhetoric, academic research, critical reading, and written analysis of text.

Mathematics 

430000 –Algebra I- The units deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. 431001 - PAP 

431000-Geometry - 9th, 10th, 11th Prerequisite: Algebra I Note: May take Geometry simultaneously with Algebra II during sophomore year if interested in reaching AP Calculus. This course will help students develop communication skills, enhance reasoning, and make connections within mathematics to other disciplines and the real world. Students will use physical models and appropriate technology to investigate geometric concepts in problem solving situations. In this course, students are engaged in real-world situations in which they form conjectures, determine the validity of these conjectures, and defend their conclusions to classmates. Appropriate technology will be integrated into the course work. 

432000 -Algebra II - 10th, 11th Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry Note: May take Geometry simultaneously with Algebra II during sophomore year if interested in reaching AP Calculus. This course builds on the basic concepts presented in Algebra I to encourage higher order thinking skills. The students will analyze and apply a variety of methods to model and graph linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities. Students will use algebraic, graphical, and numerical methods for analysis of quadratic equations, functions, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, data analysis, and probability. 

539900 College Algebra (Fall Semester/Spring Semester): This course will be offered for concurrent credit through ATU and will cover all of the topics of College Algebra including exponents/radicals, quadratic equations, systems of equations including quadratics, ratios/proportions, variation, progressions, the binomial theorem, inequalities, logarithms, and partial fractions. (Note: A grade of “C” must be earned for this course to satisfy the general education mathematics requirement in college.) 

College Trigonometry (Spring Semester): This course will be offered for concurrent credit through ATU and will cover all of the topics of College Trigonometry including trigonometric functions, degrees/radians, the unit circle, trigonometric graphs, solving trigonometric equations, trigonometric identities, solving right/oblique triangles, and inverse trigonometric functions . (Note: A grade of “C” must be earned for this course to satisfy the general education mathematics requirement in college.) 

433000 Pre-Calculus Trig Pre-Requisites include Alg 1, Alg II, Geometry. It is recommended to have an “A” or “B” in Algebra II. This course will emphasize a study of trigonometric functions and identities as well as applications of right triangle trigonometry and circular functions. Students will use symbolic reasoning and analytical methods to represent mathematical situations, express generalizations, and study mathematical concepts and the relationships among them. Students will use functions and equations as tools for expressing generalizations. Pre-Calculus does not require Arkansas Department of Education approval. 

439070 Algebra III- 11th, 12th Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II Algebra III will continue a more in depth study of Algebra II concepts and exploration of some pre-calculus concepts. Students will increase understanding of algebraic, graphical, and numerical methods to analyze, translate and solve equations based on the major families of functions. The overall goal of this course is to prepare students for College Algebra. 

439090 Statistics-11th , 12th Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra II Statistics is a two-semester course designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II and expect to further their studies in business, social sciences, or education. Statistics builds on knowledge of probability, randomness, and variability to provide students with an understanding of experimental design, estimation, hypothesis testing, and effective communication of experimental results. Statistical information collected and analyzed by students is used to investigate ways of collecting, displaying, and analyzing data. Statistics does not require Arkansas Department of Education approval. 

534040AP Calculus AB This course will prepare students to take AP Calculus BC. Topics covered will include a quick review of algebra followed by an introduction to limits, derivatives, and integrals.

534040 - AP Calculus AB - 12th Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Trigonometry (Pre-AP courses preferred) AP Calculus AB is a college-level calculus course that is equivalent to Calculus I in college. Throughout the year, students will learn (1) how to work with functions represented in a variety of ways – graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, (2) how to communicate mathematics and explain solutions to problems both verbally and in written sentences, (3) how to use graphing calculators to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions, and (4) how to apply the concepts of calculus to real-world situations. The goal of the course is for students to successfully pass the College Board AP Exam for Calculus AB, thus earning college credit for Calculus I.

Science 

423000 - Physical Science - 9th Prerequisite: Performance in 8th grade One semester of introductory physic concepts such as simple machines, Newton’s Three Laws of Motion, forms of energy, waves, light, and electricity. One semester of introductory Chemistry concepts such as phases of matter, composition of matter, the atom, chemical reactions, and the periodic chemistry table. Lab Description: Each chapter has one lab that demonstrates a science concept.. At this point standard measurements, velocity, acceleration, force motion, forms of energy, work, sound waves, electricity, lens and mirrors are studied. The second semester consists of chemistry concepts such as phases of matter, classification of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, organic compounds, and neutralization. This course qualifies towards honor diploma requirements. Lab Description: Usually one lab per chapter depicting and demonstrating the science concepts that are covered in discussion. Special Supplies/Cost: TI 30X calculator is helpful. (Not supplied by the school) description. 

420000 -Integrated Biology - 10th Prerequisite: Completed physical science Emphasizes the need to understand the basic concepts that provide the framework of biological sciences and provides insight into the thinking processes behind scientific discovery. The course employs cooperative learning and laboratory activities to facilitate learning and understanding of scientific concepts. Lab Description: Laboratory activities are done in correlation with major biological concepts throughout each chapter. Special Supplies/Costs: Colored pencils (Not supplied by the school) 

420001 – Integrated Pre-AP Biology - 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: A high degree of success in 9th grade science is strongly recommended. An evolutionary approach to the study of living things. The course begins with a unit of chemistry of life (biochemistry), followed by a unit of cellular biology, a unit of basic genetics, a unit of plants, taxonomy, and ends with an anatomy/physiology comparison of representative animals such as the earthworm, crayfish, and frog. Lab Description: Labs will be used to enhance the topics studied. Examples: biochemistry (calorie study of foods), osmosis, fermentation, bacterial/protist slide study, fresh water microscope study, and dissections of a worm, crayfish, and frog. 

520030 - AP Biology - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Completion of Biology or PreAP Biology. This course follows the curriculum guidelines set for by the College Board. It includes lectures from selected topics from the textbook. Some additional time will be spent in study/preparation for the AP exam. Special Projects/Assignments: Students will complete laboratory experiments selected from the list of 12 suggested by the College Board for AP Biology courses. 

424020 Environmental Science - 11th, 12th - Not included for Smart Core Prerequisite: Biology I Study of air, water, and land surrounding an organism or community. Includes the study of the impact of humans on the environment. Lab Description: Laboratory and hands-on activities are done in correlation with major concepts throughout each chapter. 

421001 - PreAP Chemistry - 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Physical Science and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II Designed for the college bound student who thinks a science related major and career is a definite possibility. It is designed to be more rigorous to prepare students for AP Chemistry II or Freshman Chemistry in college. It offers more problem-solving, writing and practice in higher thinking skills. Special Projects/Assignments: Homework is assigned weekly and is required. Special projects, honors assignments and small research reports are also involved. Lab Description: There is greater lab opportunity in Pre AP Chemistry as more formal labs and activities are done compared to regular Chemistry I. Special Supplies/Cost: scientific calculator (prefer graphing), notebook (Not supplied by the school) 

521030 - AP Chemistry - 11th, 12th Scheduling note: Will only be offered as a double blocked course (2 back to back periods) Prerequisite: PreAP Chemistry and Algebra II; may be taken with completion of Chemistry with permission of AP Chemistry teacher. A college level general chemistry class designed for college bound students who are planning careers in the science field including medicine and engineering. The primary focus of the class will be preparation for the AP examination which can allow students the opportunity to obtain college credit for the class. Special Projects/Homework: Students should expect to spend 5 hours per week studying outside of class. The nature of Chemistry requires the student to know certain basic facts and these must be committed to memory. The student will be given items which must be memorized to do well on the AP Exam and will be tested on these periodically throughout the year. Lab Description: The laboratory portion of this class is to be the equivalent of a college laboratory experience. Because some colleges require proof of the laboratory portion of the course before granting credit, the student will be required to keep a laboratory notebook. Special Supplies: Scientific calculator, notebooks (Not supplied by the school) Students should select Physics Mechanics, Physics Electricity & Magnetism, or Physics (A) based on math background. 

422001 Physics - 12th Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or concurrent enrollment Emphasizes the mathematical principles and concepts of physics and the solutions of problems using cooperative learning and hands-on activities. Designed for students with a strong math background. Special Projects/Assignments: Some special projects will require research outside of class. Some projects require the use of power tools. 

424031 - Human Anatomy/Physiology - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Completion of Biology or PreAP Biology and Chemistry I or PreAP Chemistry. Anatomy may be taken concurrently with PreAP Chemistry I with the permission of the Anatomy instructor. Provides a reinforcement of basic chemistry and biology, followed by a survey of the human body. This survey analyzes each of the twelve body systems with the regard to their structure and function. Lab Description: Students use plastic detailed models, anatomical charts, and skeletons to visually reinforce structural composition studied in lecture. Lab work culminates in a comparative dissection of a cat.

Social Studies 

472000 - Civics 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th – Semester Course Prerequisite: 8th grade Social Studies Note: This course is offered at the high school level only for transfer students needing to meet graduation requirements. Students must obtain approval from a school counselor before enrolling in the class. The focus of Civics is the application of civic virtues and democratic principles and investigation of problem solving in society. This course provides a study of the structure and functions of federal, state, and local government. Civics also examines constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. 

474300 - Economics - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th – Semester Course Required for graduation Note: This course is offered at the high school level only for transfer students needing to meet graduation requirements. Students must obtain approval from a school counselor before enrolling in the class. Economics is a one-semester social studies elective course that emphasizes economic decision making. Students will explore the interrelationships among consumers, producers, resources, and labor as well as the interrelationships between national and global economies. Additionally, students will examine the relationship between individual choices and the direct influence of these choices on occupational goals and future earning potential. 

571000 – ADE APPROVED World History Since 1450 - 10th, 11th, 12th STAR Reading Score must be at least 10.0 (9th) World History Since 1450 provides an in-depth study of the history of human society from Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770 to Era 9: Contemporary World since 1945. World History is designed to assist students in understanding the human condition, how people and countries of the world have become increasingly interconnected across time and space, and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives. This course develops an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international/global relations. It requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, 38 social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. 

571020 – AP World History - 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisites: Recommendation of current English teacher. Students must be willing to accept the reading and writing demands of this college-level course. AP World History is a course designed for high school students who wish to earn college credit through a rigorous study of the history of humanity. This course approaches history by identifying patterns underlying human history and analyzing how these patterns have influenced civilizations around the world. Students who take AP World History will gain greater appreciation for the diverse cultures of Earth. 

470000-Am. History-10th , 11th , The desired outcome of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between past and present events, recognize patterns of interactions, and understand the impact of events in the United States within an interconnected world. United States History Since 1890 examines the emergence of the United States as a world power to the present. Students will examine the political, economic, geographic, social, and cultural development of the United States of America from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. United States History Since 1890 references the eras and time periods from The National Center for History in the Schools. Skills and Application Throughout the course, students will develop and apply disciplinary literacy skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. As students seek answers to compelling and supporting questions, they will examine a variety of primary and secondary sources and communicate responses in multiple ways, including oral, visual, and written forms. Students must be able to select and evaluate sources of information, draw and build upon ideas, explore issues, examine data, and analyze events from the full range of human experience to develop critical thinking skills essential for productive citizens. United States History Since 1890 is required by the Standards for Accreditation and does not need Arkansas Department of Education approval. 

570020-AP US History-10 th , 11 th , 12 th This challenging course is designed to provide a college level experience and prepare students for the AP exam in early May. Over two 18 week semesters, the students are engaged in a wide variety of activities, with substantial emphasis on interpreting documents, writing analytical essays, and mastering factual content. Woven into the chronology of the course are the key themes of American History. Issues of American Identity, diversity, religion, and culture are examined. Economic transformations, the development of political institutions and reform movements are evaluated.

Fine Arts 

416000 - Drama - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisites: None A two semester course designed to give students the opportunity to produce a quality musical performance while gaining a deeper understanding of vocal technique, choreography, acting, and the history of theatre as it pertains to the modern day musical genre. Students will obtain audition skills, performance experience, and an understanding of historical context 

450070 - Art History (Baroque to Postmodern) 10th, 11th, 12th - Semester Course A one-semester course designed to teach students the significance of art throughout history. Students in this course will examine periods of art history from around the world, with emphasis on Baroque, Rococo, Pre-Modern, Modern, and Postmodern art. Students will examine characteristics of art including themes, artists, major artworks, media, and processes involved in creating artwork that is unique to each period of art. Students will explore societal influences on art from each period, and the impact art from each period has had on society. Additionally, students will apply basic terminology and higher-order thinking skills and draw inferences from artwork and artists from each period of art history. 

459010 - Music Theory - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Current instrumental or vocal music student that has taken at least Jazz Band I, Instrumental Music II, Vocal Music I, or Jazz Ensemble. Music Theory is an advanced music course designed to expand upon and enhance the skills of the serious high school musician. Music Theory students explore the fundamentals of music, tone/pitch, rhythm, intervals, scales, and, how those elements come together to create music. Students will also gain a basic understanding of music notation software used to create music, resulting in an original music composition. In addition, Music Theory students will gain valuable listening skills and practices that will help them become successful musicians, both collegiality and professionally. 

450000 - Visual Art I - 10th, 11th, 12th A two-semester course designed to teach students to apply the elements of art and the principles of design. Students are expected to use a variety of media, techniques, processes, and tools to create original artwork that demonstrates understanding of aesthetic concerns and complex compositions. These basic concepts are introduced at the Visual Art I level. As students progress through the course, they will develop, expand, and increase their real life application of problem solving through artistic maturation. Students will create, critique, reflect, and make connections to art. Students will exhibit original artwork and develop portfolios that reflect their personal growth. Visual Art I will satisfy the one-half credit fine arts requirement for graduation. Special Supplies/Cost: Canvases and brushes for painting and various other art supplies (Not supplied by the school) 

450030 - Art II - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Art I A two-semester courses designed to teach students to apply the elements of art and the principles of design. Students are expected to use a variety of media, techniques, processes, and tools to create original artwork that demonstrates understanding of aesthetic concerns and complex compositions. As students progress through the course, they will develop, expand, and increase their real life application of problem solving through artistic maturation. Students will create, critique, reflect, and make connections to art. Students will exhibit original artwork and develop portfolios that reflect their personal growth. Special Supplies/ Cost: Canvases and brushes for painting and various other art supplies (Not supplied by the school). 

450040 - Art III (A) 450050 - Art IV (A) - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Art II A two-semester courses designed to teach students to apply the elements of art and the principles of design. Students are expected to use a variety of media, techniques, processes, and tools to create original artwork that demonstrates understanding of aesthetic concerns and complex compositions. As students progress through the course, they will develop, expand, and increase their real life application of problem solving through artistic maturation. Students will create, critique, reflect, and make connections to art. Students will exhibit original artwork and develop portfolios that reflect their personal growth. Special Supplies/Cost: Canvases and brushes for painting and various other art supplies (Not supplied by the school) Prescelto Vocal Music - 452001 Vocal Music I will satisfy the one-half credit fine arts requirement for graduation. A two-semester courses designed for traditional and emerging ensembles. Students will demonstrate an ability to apply music fundamentals and vocal techniques in the production, performance, analysis, and critique of vocal music performance. Students are expected to apply sight-reading skills, improvisational skills, and performance techniques in solo, small group, and large group settings. Students will critique vocal music performances and deeply reflect upon the impact of vocal music on society as well as societal influences on vocal music. Students will regularly perform vocally in a variety of settings and will demonstrate successful completion of vocal music student learning expectations. 

Vocal Music II-452050 - 11th - Vocal Music III; 452060- 12th - Vocal music II - IV are two semester courses designed for students desiring to improve vocal and music literacy skills. Students will demonstrate an ability to apply music fundamentals, vocal techniques, and choral blending. Students will be required to participate in mandatory choral performances. 

451000 - Instrumental Music I - 9th Prerequisite: Members are selected by audition and/or director recommendation. Note: Will satisfy the one-half credit fine arts requirement for graduation. Instrumental Music I is a two-semester courses designed for traditional and emerging ensembles. Band I students will demonstrate an ability to apply music fundamentals and instrumental techniques in the production, performance, analysis, and critique of instrumental music performance. Students are expected to apply sight-reading skills, improvisational skills, and performance techniques in solo, small group, and large group settings. Band I students will critique music performances and deeply reflect upon the impact of instrumental music on society as well as societal influences on instrumental music. Students will regularly perform in a variety of settings and will demonstrate successful completion of student learning expectations. 

451040 - Instrumental Music II - 10th Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I; members are selected by audition and/or director recommendation. Instrumental Music courses are two semester courses in which students are given the opportunity to perform in a variety of settings; including but not limited to, marching band, concert band, parades and pep bands. 

451050 - Instrumental Music III - 11th Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I and II. Members are selected by audition and/or director recommendation. Instrumental Music courses are two semester courses in which students are given the opportunity to perform in a variety of settings; including but not limited to, marching band, concert band, parades and pep bands. Members will travel not only across Arkansas, but they may have opportunities to perform in venues throughout the United States. 

451060 - Instrumental Music IV - 12th Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I, II, and III. Members are selected by audition and/or director recommendation. Instrumental Music courses are two semester courses in which students are given the opportunity to perform in a variety of settings; including but not limited to, marching band, concert band, parades and pep bands. The four strands emphasize creating, performing/presenting, responding and connecting.

Career & Technical Agriculture 

491150 – Survey of AgriScience - 9th, 10th - Offered every year Prerequisite: Join FFA and pay the $20.00 membership fee. Required before one can take any other AgriScience class! Designed to provide an overview of the agricultural industry. Students will explore plant and animal science, natural resources and wildlife management, and agriculture leadership. During the shop section of the class, students will be introduced to welding, carpentry, plumbing, small engine technology, surveying, concrete, and electricity. 

491420 – Equine Science - 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Students must have had Survey of AgriScience and pay the $20.00 FFA dues. A semester study with the focus being on equine and equine production. It will introduce students to a broad spectrum of topics in Equine Science and establish a solid foundation of general horse knowledge. The course will begin with discussions of the development, domestication, and use of the horse; as well as the economic impact and future trends of the horse industry. 

491390 - Intro to Agricultural Mechanics 10th, 11th, 12th - Offered every year Full Year Course Prerequisite: Students must have had Survey of AgriScience and pay the $20.00 FFA dues. Students will cover those areas of the shop portion of Intro to AgriScience with a more in depth exploration of each area. 

491180 - Animal Science - 10th, 11th, 12th - Offered only in the Fall Prerequisite: Students must have had Survey of AgriScience and pay the $20.00 FFA dues; must enroll in Animal Science II during the same school year. A general study of animal science and production designed to build on the information introduced in Introduction to AgriScience and Technology. Topics to be covered include economic importance of livestock, genetics and animal breeding, animal nutrition, animal health, facilities and marketing. The business aspects of animal production will also be covered, as well as current ethical issues related to the production of livestock. 

491430-Beef Science-10th , 11th , 12th , Prerequisite is Survey of Agri Science. This course is designed to provide an advanced study in the science and application of beef production. 

491390 Agricultural Mechanics Credit 1: Grade Levels: 10-12 This course connects scientific principles with mechanical skills. This course will enhance the student's understanding of traditional areas of agriculture mechanics and will emphasize agricultural technology, including such topics as electricity, internal combustion engines, metal technology, construction, and the development, role, and scope of mechanical technology in agriculture.

Career & Technical - Business 

492121 Business Applications Computerized Business Applications is designed to prepare students in the use of software that is industry recognized. Topics include: word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentations, and cloud computing. This course will focus on skills needed to obtain Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certifications. 

492690 Medical Office Management This course is designed to teach students concepts and skills that will be applied in the management and administration of a medical office. The course will focus on careers in the medical office environment, office management skills, patient billing and collections, patient/client service skills, ethics, medical terminology, and health information management. Although not mandatory, many students can benefit from the on-the-job training component. The prerequisite for this course is Computerized Business Applications (492121) 

492760 - Social Media and Communications - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Technology Design and Applications (TDA) The purpose of the Social Media and Communications course is to prepare students with appropriate communication, technology, and employability skills for an entry-level position in the technology communication field and careers which employ these skills (sales, management, customer service, etc.) This is a two-semester project-based course that enhances technology skills, job search and employability skills along with communication skills. Students will create an online electronic career portfolio focused on an individual career path, create social media and viral marketing campaigns, participate in video conferencing, cloud-based collaboration, and learn and practice other workplace related communication technologies and channels. Students will apply verbal and nonverbal communication skills related to both spoken and written communications; technology will be used to enhance these skills. Productivity programs and apps will be used to teach time management, organization and collaboration skills, cloud storage and computing. Students will also create career related documents according to professional layout and design principles, and will also learn the photo and video editing skills needed to create promotional and informational business communications and viral marketing campaigns. 

492550 - Senior Technology Seminar 12th Prerequisite: Teacher Approval (Application) and completion of Digital Communications I & II. This course allows students to apply the technical skills and knowledge learned in advanced business courses. Students will utilize these skills to work on technology-based projects for the school, community, and local businesses. Students should be dependable, honest, motivated, good work ethic, have the ability to work in a team, and be creative. 

492100 - Computerized Accounting I 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Technology Design and Applications (TDA) and good basic math skills are recommended A two-semester course with emphasis on basic accounting principles as they relate to both manual and computerized financial systems. Instruction is on an integrated basis, using computers and electronic calculators as the relationships and processes of manual and computerized accounting are presented. Entry-level skills in the accounting occupations can be attained. Special Projects/ Assignments: Business simulations covering the entire accounting cycle. 

465010 - Computer Science I - 10th, 11th, 12th - Semester Course; should be taken with Computer Science II in the same calendar school year. This course provides foundational understandings of concepts in computer science that are necessary for students to function in an ever-changing technological world. Students begin to explore, apply, and move toward mastery in skills and concepts related to Computational Thinking and Problem Solving; Data and Information; Algorithms and Programs; Computers and Communications; and Community, Global, and Ethical Impacts. Emphasis will be placed in programming/coding. 

465020 - Computer Science II - 10th, 11th, 12th - Semester Course; should be taken with Computer Science I in the same calendar school year. Prerequisite: Computer Science I This course provides foundational understandings of concepts in computer science that are necessary for students to function in an ever-changing technological world. Students will build upon concepts learned in CS I to explore, apply, and move toward mastery in skills and concepts related to Computational Thinking and Problem Solving; Data and Information; Algorithms and Programs; Computers and Communications; and Community, Global, and Ethical Impacts. Emphasis will be placed in programming/coding.

493780 - JAG I 12th Prerequisite: Student and parent must agree to allow JAG instructor to follow student via text or phone calls for twelve months after graduation to encourage success after graduation. Jobs for Arkansas’ Graduates class give students knowledge in thirty-seven competencies, which cover employability skills. JAG students are encouraged to stay in high school and graduate. 

493790 - JAG Work Based LRN - 12th Prerequisite: Student and be classified as a senior. Employment competencies will be reiterated and financial literacy will be covered during the second semester. Student must be employed at least 15 hours per week at a job site. Jobs for Arkansas Graduates is a cooperative program where students receive high school credit for working out in the community. On the job training is considered an extension of the student’s high school day. Students can earn two academic credits per year for their work on the job.

Career & Technical – Family & Consumer Sciences 

493080 - Family & Consumer Science - 9th, 10th, 11th Prerequisites: None, but is recommended prior to Food & Nutrition. A year course designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed to function effectively within the family and a changing, complex society. Units include: FCCLA; individual and family relationships; housing and interior design; clothing and textiles; child development; food and nutrition; and home management and consumer education. Labs/Special Projects: 1) Clothing – students construct a simple clothing project using a guide sheet 2) Foods – students prepare food items by reading recipes and cooperating within groups 3) Foods – students complete a recipe binder. 

493020- Child Development 10th, 11th, 12th Prerequisites none: A year long course allowing students to acquire skills needed to guide the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children. Students will study pregnancy and prenatal development, birth and the newborn, types and stages of growth and development, rights and responsibilities of parents and children, needs of children, factors influencing children’s behavior, children with special needs, helping children cope with crises, the effect of technology on child development, and careers associated with child development. Students completing this course should be prepared to care for and guide the development of a child through all stages of growth – within a family, as a child-care professional, or in other experiences with children. Labs/Projects: Empathy Belly, Computerized Baby Simulation Project, Cost of newborn care analysis, develop/prepare age-appropriate learning tools for children of various ages, and evaluation project for car seat & toy safety. 

493030 Clothing I,II Grade Levels: 9-12 (1 credit) Experience in the Clothing and Textiles course are designed to assist students in developing skills necessary for decision making as a clothing consumer and for understanding the role of the clothing and textile industry in the economy. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to clothing selection, clothing needs of family members, clothing care, characteristics of natural and synthetic fibers, types of fabrics and fabric finishes, laws and regulations related to the clothing and textiles industry, use and care of basic sewing supplies and equipment, fabric selection, clothing construction techniques, jobs and careers in clothing and textiles, computer use in clothing and textiles, and effects of technology on the clothing and textiles industry. Upon completion of this course, the student should acquire skills needed for clothing and textiles occupations and develop knowledge of the impact of technology on the clothing and textiles industry.

Electives 

414000 - Oral Comm A (1st Semester) Oral Comm B (2nd Semester) - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th - Semester Course. A course that focuses on developing a student’s individual speaking skills. The student uses these skills throughout the course by presenting speeches (such as informative, process, and persuasive.) They also work with others in group activities. The goal is to prepare them for the future in both their personal and business life. This class is required for graduation. (Beginning in the 2017-2018 school year all 10th grade students received credit for oral communications through ADE Approved English 10 Oral Comm Embedded Class). 

480000 - Health - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th - One Semester Course Required for graduation The students will gain a working knowledge of pertinent health issues that affect their everyday lives. Each semester may vary somewhat and each health teacher may emphasize some areas more than others. Typically the course covers issues on sex education, including sexually transmitted diseases, nutrition-including eating disorders, relationships, and first aid/ CPR. Special Supplies/Cost: If Red Cross certification is offered – students are asked to pay a small fee required by Red Cross. (Not supplied by the school) 

485001- Physical Education (1st Semester) 485002- Physical Education (2nd Semester) 10th, 11th, 12th Physical Education can be taken for a full year. Students are expected to dress out and participate in daily activities that will vary throughout the semester. Fitness is encouraged in such activities as walking, weight training, basketball, and volleyball. Special Supplies/Cost: Locks for lockers and workout clothes are required. 48500Y- Physical Education (Full Year) 10th, 11th, 12th Physical Education can be taken for a full year. Students are expected to dress out and participate in daily activities that will vary throughout the semester. Fitness is encouraged in such activities as walking, weight training, basketball, and volleyball. Special Supplies/Cost: Locks for lockers and workout clothes are required. 

415000 - Journalism 10th, 11th, 12th - Academic Credit Prerequisite: Students need to have an interest in and proficiency in writing. The focus of this course is to develop journalistic writing skills in the context of news and feature formats. Students will produce writing for the school newspaper as well as other school publications. A variety of writing styles will be studied along with an emphasis on the history and ethics of journalism. 

999131 - Yearbook - 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th - Activity Credit Prerequisite: Yearbook teacher approval only. Students must have completed an application. The yearbook staff sells advertising, takes photographs, creates layouts, and writes the copy for the current year’s record of Greenwood High School. In short, students are responsible for producing the yearbook. Special Projects/Assignments: Students selected for the yearbook staff must be dedicated and willing to work extra time after school to see that deadlines are met. Knowledge of computers is a plus. The yearbook is created using Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop. Grades are based on ad sales to cover the cost of yearbook production, performance in class and commitment to the yearbook. 

690040 - Driver Education 10th, 11th, 12th One Semester Course Academic Credit - cannot count in 22 required academic graduation credits. Prerequisite: Must present driving permit when signing up for the class. This program is designed to provide 30 hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours of behind-the-wheel training that is individually tailored to the students’ level of skill. In addition to individual driving instructions, information will be provided and discussed concerning such topics as the effects of alcohol and drugs, distracted driving, sharing the road, and driving in adverse conditions. Our goal is to instill a desire and ability for students to become competent and safe drivers. Guest speakers include: a police officer, an insurance agent, and a train engineer. 

590820 - Robotics I (Fundamentals of Electricity) - Semester Course - 10th, 11th Prerequisite: PreAP Algebra I and PreAP Geometry Students must enroll in Robotics II during the same school year. Concurrent current offered (3 college credits, 1 high school credit) Course will be taught by a UA Fort Smith instructor. An overall study of the Fundamental Principles of AC and DC, Ohm’s law, and the power equation. Series, parallel, series-parallel circuits, and DC meters are introduced, and a study is made of the practical applications of mathematics related to electronics and electricity. Students will be working with electricity in the field of Robotics or Automation. 

590830 - Robotics II (Introduction to Electronics Technology) - Semester Course - 10th, 11th Prerequisite: Robotics I Students must enroll in Robotics I during the same school year. Concurrent current offered (3 college credits, 1 high school credit) Course will be taught by a UA Fort Smith instructor. Introduces the basic terms, powers of ten usages, component identification, and fundamental circuit building required to be successful in the pursuit of electronics technology. 590840 - Robotics III (Industrial Electricity) - Semester Course - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Robotics II Students must enroll in Robotics IV during the same school year. Concurrent current offered (3 college credits, 1 high school credit) Course will be taught by a UA Fort Smith instructor. Fundamentals of motors and motor control. Includes switches, relays, transformers, three-phase power systems, DC motors, single-phase motors, three-phase motors, overload protection, and motor controllers. The National Electrical Code standards for all circuits are emphasized. 580850 - Robotics IV (Electrical Currents and Components) Semester Course - 11th, 12th Prerequisite: Robotics III Students must enroll in Robotics III during the same school year. Concurrent current offered (3 college credits, 1 high school credit) Course will be taught by a UA Fort Smith instructor. Details how individual components react to AC and DC. Includes the study of inductors, transformers, capacitors, R-C circuits, R-L circuits, R-L-C circuits, time constants, series parallel resonant circuits, and filters. 

696000 ACT Prep - Fall and Spring Semester Course - Students will receive local credit only with no grade assigned toward college scale. The goal of ACT Prep is for all students to achieve a composite score of at least “19” on the ACT, and to be unconditionally admitted to their college or university of choice. Students may also qualify for more financial assistance. To personalize the ACT focus area for students, after a school registers students for the ACT Prep course, Virtual Arkansas will contact the school regarding student placement. If a student has already taken the ACT, Virtual Arkansas will work with the school to place the student in the focus areas that may improve the student’s ACT score the next time the test is taken. Schools will have the flexibility to place a student in one focus area the first nine-weeks and in a different focus area for the second nine-weeks. For example, a student may be enrolled in the Mathematics focus area the first nine-weeks and move into the Scientific Reasoning and Data Analysis focus area for the second nine-weeks. A student may also spend the entire semester in the English Reading and Grammar focus areas. Or a student may enroll in the English Grammar focus area the first nine-weeks and Scientific Reasoning and Data Analysis the second nine-weeks. To receive the ½ unit of credit, a student must remain in the course for the full semester. Students may earn up to 1 unit by completing all four focus areas, either in one semester or during the full academic year. The course is designed to comply with all the curricular requirements of the American College Testing Program (ACT). ABOVE STATE REQUIREMENTS. 

440000 Spanish I-Full Year Course- In this course, students will begin to develop the skills needed to communicate effectively in the Spanish language and develop an in-depth awareness of the various Spanish-speaking cultures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand elementary spoken Spanish; use vocabulary for practical, everyday use; speak with comprehensible pronunciation; read and write simple Spanish paragraphs; and discuss and demonstrate appreciation for Spanish cultures. 

440020 Spanish II- Credit In this course, students will build on skills developed in Spanish I and continue to work on communicating effectively in the Spanish language and increasing awareness of Spanish speaking cultures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand spoken Spanish at the novice level; use vocabulary for practical, everyday use; speak with comprehensible pronunciation; read and write simple Spanish paragraphs; discuss and demonstrate an appreciation for Spanish cultures. 

441000 French I - Full Year Course - 1 Credit In this course, students will begin to develop the skills needed to communicate effectively in the French language and develop an in-depth awareness of the various French-speaking cultures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand elementary spoken French; use vocabulary for practical, everyday use; speak with comprehensible pronunciation; read and write simple French paragraphs; and discuss and demonstrate appreciation for Francophone cultures. 

441010 French II - Full Year Course - 1 Credit In this course, students will build on skills developed in French I and continue to work on communicating effectively in the French language and increasing awareness of French-speaking cultures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand spoken French at the novice level; use vocabulary for practical, everyday use; speak with comprehensible pronunciation; read and write simple French paragraphs; discuss and demonstrate an appreciation for Francophone cultures. 

442000 German I - Full Year Course - 1 Credit German I stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. As communication skills develop, the course includes additional vocabulary and basic grammar necessary for limited reading and writing. The course is defined by the content standards of the Arkansas Foreign Language Curriculum Framework for German I and includes applications, problem solving, higher-order thinking skills, and performance-based, open-ended assessments with rubrics. Two years of the same foreign language is required by the Standards for Accreditation to be taught in Arkansas public high schools. German I may be used to partially fulfill this requirement. Arkansas Department of Education approval is not required. 

442010 German II - Full Year Course - 1 Credit German II develops and expands the fundamental skills introduced in German I. Aural comprehension, pronunciation, and speaking exercises facilitate oral communication. Additional vocabulary and grammar are introduced to lead to more advanced reading and writing. Authentic reading materials and audio/video recordings enrich instruction. The course is defined by the content standards of the Arkansas Foreign Language Curriculum Framework for German II and includes applications, problem solving, higher-order thinking skills, and performance-based, open-ended assessments with rubrics. Two years of the same foreign language is required by the Standards for Accreditation to be taught in Arkansas public high schools. German II may be used to partially fulfill this requirement. German I is a prerequisite for this course. 

439100 Computer Science and Mathematics - Full Year Course - 1 Credit Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Algebra I and Geometry. Students may be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II or have successfully completed the course. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply a mathematics background to computer science projects. Students will explore the uses of mathematics and computer programming as tools in creating workable solutions to complex problems. Student will refine fundamental skills of computer with science within a mathematical context. Throughout the year, the class will complete several independent and collaborative projects with real-world relevance.

HVAC I: Fundamentals of Electricity Concurrent ATU Ozark 

The characteristics of alternating current, waves, phase relations, transfer action, electrical circuits, and its use with controls, motors, relays, including legends and symbols are taught. In addition, the student will study the wide variety of motors, single and three phase used in the air conditioning and refrigeration field. 

HVAC II: ACR 1301: Industrial Safety in Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Concurrent ATU Ozark 

The hazards associated with the different refrigerants, electricity, the oxy-acetylene torch, radon, carbon monoxide, extreme heat and extreme cold and ladder safety will be addressed. 

HSCI 1113: Medical Terminology Concurrent ATU Ozark 

Medical Terminology is the study of the language of medical words that relate to the body systems, anatomical structures, and medical processes and procedures. This course includes medical word construction, definitions, spellings, and the use of terms in the medical field. 

CNA 1114: Nursing Assistant 

This course covers the fundamental principles, skills, and attitudes needed to give nursing care and prevent the spread of disease. Procedures used in the care of the sick and the ability to adapt them to various situations are discussed. Students will learn to document their observations and interventions.